Turmeric-Avocado Deviled Eggs

This is the second batch of deviled eggs that I made for the Ostara Potluck I attended.

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The first batch was the Pink Deviled Eggs I wrote about a few days ago.

Unlike the pink eggs, which used leftover beet brine, I made a fermented turmeric brine especially for these eggs.  They will need to be started at least 2 weeks in advance of when you want to serve them in order for you to have time to ferment the turmeric brine.

But the results are worth it!

Turmeric adds the yellow colour to the outside of the eggs, and is also a powerful antioxidant and anti-inflamatory.

The avocado not only provides the green creamyness to the yolk filling, it also provides some heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, a ton of nutrients and yet more anti-inflammatory properties.

These are a stunning contribution to a potluck, but also make great snacks and would look wonderful on an Easter buffet table.  They would also be good for breakfast or in packed lunches.

You could also just eat the turmeric pickled eggs whole without going to the trouble of cutting and filling them with the avocado mixture.

Whole eggs/egg whites are an AIP stage 2 reintroduction, so if you are following the AIP plan, you will need to wait until you have successfully reintroduced egg yolks and egg whites before eating these.

Turmeric Avocado Deviled Eggs

Makes 24 halved eggs

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To make the turmeric brine:

  • 2 TBSP pink Himalayan salt
  • 1 small carrot – sliced – peel if not organic
  • 2″fresh root ginger – sliced thinly
  • 2″ fresh turmeric root – sliced thinly
  • 4-5 slices fresh horseradish root
  • 3 cloves garlic – peeled
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 cabbage leaf (to weigh down the veggies to ensure they all stay underneath the brine)

To make the eggs

  • 1 dozen eggs – preferably free-range/pastured/soy-free

To make the filling

  • 1 large ripe avocado – peeled and diced
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 tbsp fresh parsley – chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh basil – chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh chives – chopped
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme – chopped
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

The first thing that needs to be done is that the brine needs to be made and fermented.  This needs to be started at least 2 weeks before you want to serve the eggs.

Take all the brine ingredients, except for the cabbage, and put them in a quart mason jar.  Add filtered water to cover and mix well to dissolve the salt.  Tuck the cabbage leaf on top of the veggies to hold them down under the brine.  If necessary weigh this down with a small jar or shot-glass filled with brine.

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Cover and leave to stand at room temperature for at least 7 days.  It may get fizzy and bubbly as the naturally occurring cultures start to ferment the sugars in the veggies and herbs.  This is normal.  Open the lid every now and again to release the gas.

Once the brine is fermented to your liking, strain out all the solids, reserving the fermented brine.

Take the dozen eggs, and place them in a pan with cold water.  Bring to the boil, reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes.

Drain and place in cold water.

Once the eggs have cooled enough to handle, peel off the shells and pack the eggs in a large mason jar.

Carefully pour over the brine to cover the eggs.

Place the eggs in the fridge and leave to “pickle” for 5-7 days.

To make the deviled eggs…

Drain the eggs from the brine.

Cut each egg in half lengthwise and carefully scoop out the yolk.

Mash the yolks with the avocado.

Place the herbs, garlic, lemon juice and the olive oil in a blender or food processor and puree to a paste.

Add the herb puree to the egg yolks and avocado and mix well.

Season to taste with sea salt.

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Carefully spoon or pipe the green mixture back into the egg whites and arrange on a serving platter.

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Rutabaga Hashbrowns

These hashbrowns are very quick to make and are wonderful for breakfast when served alongside other “breakfast foods” such as bacon or sausage patties.

This recipe is 100% AIP, and is egg and nightshade free.

The tapioca flour serves to bind these together, taking the place of the starch that is in traditional (potato) hashbrowns.

This recipe serves 1 person, but is very easy to scale up to however many servings you need.

Rutabaga Hashbrowns

Serves 1

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  • 1 cup grated rutabaga
  • 1 Tbsp tapioca flour
  • 1 Tbsp chopped fresh chives
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 Tbsp fat of choice to cook (I used bacon fat)

Mix the grated rutabaga with the tapioca flour and chives.  Season to taste with sea salt.

Heat the fat in a large skillet over a medium-high heat.

Tip the rutabaga mixture into the fat and press down to make a flat pancake aprox. ¼ inch thick.

Allow the rutabaga too cook for about 5 minutes until the base is crisp and brown.

Carefully flip the rutabaga over, trying not to allow it to break.

Cook on the second side for 5 minutes until that side is also crisp and brown.

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Transfer to a serving plate and top with whatever else you are planning on serving.

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I served this with wilted baby-greens, caramelized onions and 2 homemade sausage patties.

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Pink Deviled Eggs

This is an unusual way to prepare eggs, but it is both delicious and very striking to look at.

I made these for a Ostara celebration that I attended.

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They would also be perfect for Easter, and would make a stunning addition to a brunch table.  I also made some yellow deviled eggs as well, but they are a separate recipe.

They also make great appetizers or snacks.  Kids love them due to the unusual colour…

The striking pink-purple colour is 100% natural, and comes from soaking the cooked and peeled eggs in leftover beet-brine or beet kvass.

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The eggs need to soak in the brine for several days  – the longer you soak them, the more the whites take on the colour – I left these in the brine for 7 days, and as you can see, the purple-pink colour penetrated all the way to the yolks.  In fact, the yolks were stained slightly pink at the edges.  I suspect that leaving them in the brine for even longer would result in pink yolks as well.

If you also need to make the beet brine or kvass, you will need to start these at least 2 weeks in advance.  The recipe for the beet brine/kvass can be found here.

While these are not 100% AIP (egg yolks are a stage 1 reintroduction, and egg whites are a stage 2 reintroduction), if you have successfully managed to reintroduce eggs, you could enjoy these beauties.

Pink Deviled Eggs

makes 2 dozen halved eggs

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  • 1 dozen eggs
  • beet brine or beet kvass to cover
  • ¼ cup homemade mayonnaise
  • ¼ cup coconut milk yoghurt
  • 2 tbsp fresh dill – chopped
  • salt and black pepper to taste (black pepper is a stage 2 reintroduction – omit this if sensitive to it)
  • dill sprigs to garnish

Place the eggs in a pan and cover with cold water.  Bring to the boil, then simmer for 10 minutes.

Drain the eggs and cover in cold water.  Leave to stand until completely cold.

Remove the shells from the eggs, and place them in a large mason jar.  Cover the eggs with the beet brine/beet kvass, and put on a lid.

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Store the eggs in the fridge for between 3 and 7 days.  The longer you leave the eggs, the more colour the whites will take.

To make the deviled eggs, drain off the beet brine/kvass.

Slice each egg in half, lengthwise and scoop the yolks into a bowl.

Mash the yolks with the mayonnaise and coconut milk yoghurt until smooth.  Season with salt and black pepper, and stir in the dill.

Spoon or pipe the yolk mixture back into the whites and garnish with a small sprig of dill.

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Keep in the fridge until you are ready to serve, and be prepared to explain to everyone how you achieved that wonderful colour!

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Depression as a Food Reaction

salixisme:

An interesting post by Petra8paleo about mental health and how it can be affected by diet. It specifically deals with reintroductions to the AIP diet and how they can affect depression.

Originally posted on petra8paleo:

Matthew & Petra

Recently I tried reintroducing Macadamia Nuts into my Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) and I learned something about my mental health.

Organic raw dehydrated Macadamias were a go: I noticed no untoward effects.

But the supermarket non-organic kind in a tin were not. My stomach felt mildly inflamed, my energy plummeted and most interestingly, I felt quite depressed for several hours.

I could easily have ignored the stomach thing, but the depression was untenable.

I’d been upbeat & happy, then suddenly, about an hour after cracking the mac nut tin, all the joy and potential bled out of the world. I was no longer able to do my day. All I could do was steep in gloom, deep under the covers, with the woe of the world crashing down on me.

The first time it happened, the experience was so real and consuming it took awhile before I realized I was having…

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Choco-Bananacado Mousse – AIP/Vegan/Raw

A chocolate craving the other night, and a need for some comfort food led me to develop the recipe for this mousse

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It actually does not contain any chocolate – I used carob instead.

This recipe is 100% AIP, it is also vegan and raw as it contains no eggs.

But despite this, it is just as satisfying and “chocolatey” as any chocolate mousse I have ever tried.  It is also very rich and filling.

Choco-Bananacado Mousse

Serves 2

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  • 1 ripe avocado
  • 1 ripe banana
  • 3 TBSP carob powder
  • ¼ vanilla powder
  • pinch of Himalayan salt
  • 1 TBSP coconut oil
  • 1 TBSP raw honey
  • 3 TBSP coconut cream (the thick layer at the top of a can of coconut milk)
  • Whipped coconut cream and fresh raspberries to garnish (optional)

This is a very easy recipe that takes only seconds to whip up…  perfect for when you need a “chocolate” fix in a hurry.

Peel the avocado and remove the pit.  Place the avocado flesh in a food processor with the banana, carob powder, vanilla powder, salt, coconut oil, coconut cream and honey.

Process on high for a minute or two until the mixture is smooth.

Transfer to two individual serving dishes or jars.

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This can be chilled in the fridge or consumed immediately.  Chilling in the fridge will result in a firm texture.

Serve garnished with whipped coconut cream and fresh fruit if you like.

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It is delicious eaten just as it is though.

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Slow Cooker Carnitas with Plantain Wraps

I had some pork shoulder that needed using up, so I decided that I was going to make carnitas in the slow cooker.  I left them cooking all day while I was out, and by the time I came home they were amazingly tender and falling ppart.

I looked at the meat and decided that we needed something to accompany it – a wrap perhaps?  So I got cooking and came up with this recipe.

I served the carnitas in the wrap with some avocado cream that I made.

The carnitas are 100% AIP friendly, but the wraps do contain whole eggs which are an AIP stage 2 reintroduction.  If you need a 100% AIP plantain wrap, one can be found here.  The wraps are gluten, nut and dairy-free however.

Slow Cooker Carnitas with Plantain Wraps

serves 6

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For the Carnitas:

  • 2½lb boneless pork shoulder
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 2 tsp dried oregano
  • 2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • sea salt to taste
  • 1 large onion – cut into 8 wedges
  • 3 dried bay leaves

For the Plantain Wraps:

  • 3 green plantains
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • coconut oil to cook

For the Avocado Cream:

  • 3 ripe avocados
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • zest and juice of 1 lime
  • ½ cup coconut cream (the thick stuff that rises to the top of coconut milk)
  • 2 tbsp avocado or coconut oil
  • sea salt to taste

To make the carnitas:

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Take the pork and cut it into large cubes – about 1½” in size.

Place these in a slow cooker with the garlic, oregano, vinegar, salt and stir to mix.

Scatter the onion and bay leaves evenly over the meat.

Turn the slow cooker on and cook on low for 8 hours.

Discard the bay leaf and shred the meat, mixing in the onions.

Keep warm while making the wraps and the avocado cream.

To make the plantain wraps:

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Cut the tops and bottoms off the plantains and then cut a slit in the skin along the full length.  Use your thumbs to peel off the skin.  Cut the plantain in chunks and put in a food processor or blender along with the eggs.

Puree at a high speed, gradually adding the water until you achieve a pancake batter consistency.  You may need a little more or a little less water depending on the size of your eggs and the size of the plantains.

Season with sea salt.

Heat a little coconut oil in a skillet over a medium-high heat, then add ½ cup of the batter, swirling the pan around to spread it out as evenly as possible.  Allow to cook for 3-5 minutes until the top is set and the bottom is golden brown.  Flip the wrap over and cook for a further 2-3 minutes to cook the top.

Remove the wrap from the pan, keep warm and repeat with the remaining batter.

To make the avocado cream:

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Place all the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until smooth.

To assemble:

Place the plantain wrap on a plate and pile on a generous amount of the shredded meat.  Top with the avocado cream.

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Fold up and serve….

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These are incredibly filling!

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Oven Baked Rutabaga Fries

Rutabaga fries are my latest obsession.  When roasted in the oven, they crisp up and take on a wonderful caramelized flavour.

They are very easy to make as well.

Oven Roasted Rutabaga Fries

serves 6

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  • 1 large rutabaga
  • 2-3 tbsp melted coconut oil
  • sea salt to taste

Preheat the oven to 220°C/425°F.

Peel the rutabaga and cut into fries – I find chunky ones work best.

Toss the fries in the melted coconut oil and then spread out in a single layer on a large, rimmed baking sheet.  Keeping them to a single layer means that they crisp up rather than being soggy.

Season well with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Bake in the oven for 30-40 minutes, tossing every 10 minutes.

Check them frequently towards the end of the cooking time as they can go from perfectly browned and crisp to burned and charcoal very quickly.

Serve at once.

Hand-Knitted Socks

When I saw my daughters the other week, I took them some socks that I had knitted them…

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A was lucky, and she got not just a pair of socks, but also a pair of boot-toppers that I had made with some leftover yarn:

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C was given a pair of REALLY bright neon-coloured socks:

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J’s socks were more conservatively coloured….

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And B had a pair of stripy “scrap-yarn” socks that took me ages to knit, and even longer to weave in all the ends!

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And then this is a picture that I had taken of me and the girls…

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I apologize for the quality of the pictures – they were taken using a cell-phone.

Tuna Salad – Paleo/AIP/Egg-Free

I made myself a super quick tuna salad for lunch the other day…

And when paired with a baked sweet potato (I used a white one) and some green salad leaves, it made a very tasty, very filling and quite economical lunch.

This recipe serves 2, so I saved half of it in the fridge for the next day.

It is both Paleo and AIP, and contains no eggs or mayonnaise, and because of this, it is lighter in texture and fresher in taste than a lot of tuna salads.

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AIP Tuna Salad

Serves 2

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  • 1 can of tuna in water (BPA free)
  • 1 lacto-fermented cucumber pickle – finely diced (if bought, read the ingredients to ensure that they do not contain nightshade spices)
  • ½ cup coconut milk yogurt (if bought, read the ingredients to ensure that it does not contain any gums such as carageenan or guar gum)
  • 1 stick celery – finely diced
  • 1 green onions – finely chopped
  • 2 TBSP capers – drained and coarsely chopped
  • 2 TBSP finely chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • sea salt or pink Himalayan salt to taste

Drain the water from the tuna and put it in a bowl.

Finely dice the pickle, celery and onion.  Chop the parsley and capers.

Add all the ingredients to the bowl, and mix together gently.  Season to taste with salt.

This salad can be stored in the fridge for up to 48 hours.

Serve on baked sweet potatoes, with AIP-crackers, in an AIP-wrap or with celery sticks….  or you could just eat it out of the bowl with a spoon!

Shared at the Paleo AIP Recipe Roundup #66

International Women’s Day

In honor of today being International Women’s Day, I just wanted to post the following 2 pictures:

strongwoman

 

realwoman

I hope everyone is having a good day.

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